The Top 3 Tips for Spraying in High Heat by Brian Lynch

Holy crap it’s hot! I tried to think of cute ways to begin a note about dealing with the heat while painting and all I kept thinking was, ‘Holy crap, it’s hot!’ That’s it isn’t it? It’s just hot. You can put your favorite four letter word in front of it or behind it, or maybe you can’t muster the strength, but…still… Holy crap, it’s Hot!

Politics aside, a “warming trend” is as real as it gets. 100-year-old heat records are falling like that life alert lady, and we don’t have an emergency button around our neck to save us! “Help, it’s hot and I can’t get up.”

The fact is when painting in this excessive heat, paint behaves differently (and so do I really). Paint is designed to coat something with a layer of protection and color. To accomplish this various chemical and physical events take place as paint is applied and as it’s drying.

Heat beyond normal can make the chemical drying part of paints react too quickly. When this happens the paint is often over-applied, or forced, in an effort to “flow” or wet up the surface. A forced coat will dry out of sequence with the top drying first. This often will trap solvents and prevent the rest of the layer from drying well, or even completely. Which is kind of weird because it would seem anything drying too quickly would, of course, dry well, right? But, no.

When selecting paint, and additives such as thinners and reducers, select the slower options in very hot climates. It might seem that a slow option would take more time to dry, and we all want fast, but it’s simply not true. The fastest, smoothest application will always be when paint is sprayed with the appropriate speed chemicals for the job size and temperature. Sure, when it’s cold the slow options might be slower than you would like, but, you have been reading, right? It’s hot!

3 Keys to Remember::
1) Keep your air pressures under control: too much air pressure will quick-flash the surface leading to rough texture and poor adhesion.
2) Keep your gun/airbrush in close; paint dries in the air so the more distance the drier the spray will be.
3) Don’t wet down the spray area floor; it may seem like a good idea but it will dramatically raise the humidity, another enemy of paint.

These are the top three tips for now. I hope it helps. If you take care of your paint it will take care of you.

 

 

Comments

  1. I really enjoy reading your blog. I have a question and it would be great if you can answer. I assume that you have a lot of visitors daily but why your website is loading so fast? My website is loading very slowly! What kind of hosting you are using? I heard hostgator is good but its price is quite high for me. Thanks in advance.

Speak Your Mind

*